7 Great Cruise Line Recipes

by Sherri Eisenberg

7 Great Cruise Line Recipes

by Sherri Eisenberg

On every cruise, there's a dish that stands out as the scene-stealer of the trip. These food memories stick in your mind — sometimes we can smell and taste our favorites long after we disembark. But we're impatient, and we hate to wait until we're on board again to indulge in these favorite treats, so we asked the cruise lines to share their recipes. Fortunately, they obliged. Here, the recipes for our favorite dishes from cruise lines, ready to be made in your home. 

7
Cruise ship food just keeps on getting better. / Princess Cruises
Melting chocolate cake on Carnival Imagination
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1. Melting Chocolate Cake
Served at: The main dining room on all Carnival ships

This crowd-pleaser is easily the line's most popular dish. And who can blame cruisers for ordering it again and again? Served in the main dining room at dinnertime every single day on every single ship, the warm chocolate cake oozes in the middle, and pairs perfectly with creamy vanilla ice cream. The good news: It's super simple to make and requires no complicated techniques or hard-to-find ingredients. 
 
Ingredients
  • 6 oz dark chocolate
  • 6 oz butter
  • 4 eggs at room temperature
  • 6 oz sugar
  • 2 oz flour

Directions
1. Melt the chocolate and butter.

2. Mix the eggs and sugar and whisk for few minutes, add the flour.

3. Add the egg mix to the melted chocolate and mix.

4. Pour the mix in a greased mold.

5. Bake directly in the oven at 400° F for 14 minutes.

6. Serve with ice cream and fruit garnish.
Served at: The main dining room on all Carnival ships

This crowd-pleaser is easily the line's most popular dish. And who can blame cruisers for ordering it again and again? Served in the main dining room at dinnertime every single day on every single ship, the warm chocolate cake oozes in the middle, and pairs perfectly with creamy vanilla ice cream. The good news: It's super simple to make and requires no complicated techniques or hard-to-find ingredients. 
 
Ingredients
  • 6 oz dark chocolate
  • 6 oz butter
  • 4 eggs at room temperature
  • 6 oz sugar
  • 2 oz flour

Directions
1. Melt the chocolate and butter.

2. Mix the eggs and sugar and whisk for few minutes, add the flour.

3. Add the egg mix to the melted chocolate and mix.

4. Pour the mix in a greased mold.

5. Bake directly in the oven at 400° F for 14 minutes.

6. Serve with ice cream and fruit garnish.
Manfredi's pea soup on Viking Sea
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2. Pea Soup
Served at: Mamsen's on Viking Ocean Cruises
 
This comforting soup is the secret hero of Mamsen's late-night menu. Sure, after dinner you may not be hungry, but this warm pea soup is made from the founder's grandmother's recipe. It's filled with vegetables and often topped with crumbled bacon, so every night the smell fills the air in the ship's most popular cocktail lounge.
 
Ingredients
  • 1 lb dried split peas
  • 8 cups low-sodium chicken broth, more as needed
  • 1 medium onion, diced
  • 1 ham hock
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 2 tsp salt
  • 1 1/2 tsp black pepper
  • 8 slices bacon, cooked and crumbled

Directions
1. Place peas in a colander and rinse, picking through and discarding any shriveled peas or other debris. Transfer peas to a large saucepan.

2. Add chicken broth and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce heat to low and simmer for 10 minutes.

3. Add onion, ham hock, bay leaf, salt and pepper, stirring to combine.

4. Cook, stirring often to prevent burning, until peas are very soft and creamy, about 40 minutes. Add additional broth or water if soup begins to thicken too much and sticks to bottom.

5. Remove from heat. Take out ham hock, and pull off meat; chop and return ham to soup.

6. Ladle soup into bowls and garnish with bacon. Serve hot.

Served at: Mamsen's on Viking Ocean Cruises
 
This comforting soup is the secret hero of Mamsen's late-night menu. Sure, after dinner you may not be hungry, but this warm pea soup is made from the founder's grandmother's recipe. It's filled with vegetables and often topped with crumbled bacon, so every night the smell fills the air in the ship's most popular cocktail lounge.
 
Ingredients
  • 1 lb dried split peas
  • 8 cups low-sodium chicken broth, more as needed
  • 1 medium onion, diced
  • 1 ham hock
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 2 tsp salt
  • 1 1/2 tsp black pepper
  • 8 slices bacon, cooked and crumbled

Directions
1. Place peas in a colander and rinse, picking through and discarding any shriveled peas or other debris. Transfer peas to a large saucepan.

2. Add chicken broth and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce heat to low and simmer for 10 minutes.

3. Add onion, ham hock, bay leaf, salt and pepper, stirring to combine.

4. Cook, stirring often to prevent burning, until peas are very soft and creamy, about 40 minutes. Add additional broth or water if soup begins to thicken too much and sticks to bottom.

5. Remove from heat. Take out ham hock, and pull off meat; chop and return ham to soup.

6. Ladle soup into bowls and garnish with bacon. Serve hot.

Crystal's mushroom soup from Prego
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3. Mushroom Soup
Served at: Prego on Crystal Serenity and Crystal Symphony
 
There are a lot of great choices on the menu at Prego, the restaurant designed by Piero Selvaggio of Valentino in Santa Monica, California, but the one people talk about most is this creamy soup, served in a hollowed-out bread bowl. The only risk of making it at home: You can't ignore how much cream needs to be added to make it taste this good. 
 
Ingredients
  • 1 oz dried morels, or 2 oz fresh morels
  • 3 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1/2 cup portobello mushroom, finely sliced
  • 2 oz white mushrooms
  • 3 oz fresh porcini mushrooms, finely sliced
  • 3 shallots, minced
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • Salt and white pepper 
  • 1/2 cup dry white wine
  • 4 cups chicken stock
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream
  • 2 tbsp minced fresh flat-leaf Italian parsley
  • Leaves from 1 fresh thyme sprig, minced
  • Leaves from 1 fresh oregano sprig, minced 
  • 2 large fresh basil leaves, chopped 
  • 4 6-inch round bread loaves
  • Fresh rosemary sprigs
 
Directions
1. If using dried morels, wash the caps and soak them in warm water to cover for 10 minutes. Remove the stems and discard them. Cut small morels in half and large ones into 3 or 4 pieces. 
 
2. In a medium saucepan over medium heat, heat the olive oil and sauté all the mushrooms for about 3 minutes. Add the shallots and garlic and sauté for 2 minutes. Season with salt and pepper to taste, add the wine, and cook to reduce the liquid by half.
 
3. Add the stock and bring to a boil. Reduce heat, cover, and simmer the soup for about 25 minutes.
 
4. In a blender or food processor, purée half the soup until very smooth. Return the purée to the pan. Stir in the parsley, thyme, oregano, and basil and cook for about 2 minutes. Taste and adjust the seasoning. Keep warm.
 
Crystal serves this soup in oregano bread cups. Any plain or flavored bread loaf may be substituted, but this soup is also delicious simply served in shallow soup bowls. If you are using the bread bowls:
 
1. Preheat the oven to 200°F.
 
2. Cut off the top of each bread loaf. With a large spoon, remove the soft inner part of the bread.
 
3. Place the loaves on a baking pan and warm in the oven for about 5 minutes. Remove the warm bread loaves from the oven and pour the hot soup into the bread cups.
 
4. Garnish with the rosemary sprigs and serve.
Served at: Prego on Crystal Serenity and Crystal Symphony
 
There are a lot of great choices on the menu at Prego, the restaurant designed by Piero Selvaggio of Valentino in Santa Monica, California, but the one people talk about most is this creamy soup, served in a hollowed-out bread bowl. The only risk of making it at home: You can't ignore how much cream needs to be added to make it taste this good. 
 
Ingredients
  • 1 oz dried morels, or 2 oz fresh morels
  • 3 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1/2 cup portobello mushroom, finely sliced
  • 2 oz white mushrooms
  • 3 oz fresh porcini mushrooms, finely sliced
  • 3 shallots, minced
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • Salt and white pepper 
  • 1/2 cup dry white wine
  • 4 cups chicken stock
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream
  • 2 tbsp minced fresh flat-leaf Italian parsley
  • Leaves from 1 fresh thyme sprig, minced
  • Leaves from 1 fresh oregano sprig, minced 
  • 2 large fresh basil leaves, chopped 
  • 4 6-inch round bread loaves
  • Fresh rosemary sprigs
 
Directions
1. If using dried morels, wash the caps and soak them in warm water to cover for 10 minutes. Remove the stems and discard them. Cut small morels in half and large ones into 3 or 4 pieces. 
 
2. In a medium saucepan over medium heat, heat the olive oil and sauté all the mushrooms for about 3 minutes. Add the shallots and garlic and sauté for 2 minutes. Season with salt and pepper to taste, add the wine, and cook to reduce the liquid by half.
 
3. Add the stock and bring to a boil. Reduce heat, cover, and simmer the soup for about 25 minutes.
 
4. In a blender or food processor, purée half the soup until very smooth. Return the purée to the pan. Stir in the parsley, thyme, oregano, and basil and cook for about 2 minutes. Taste and adjust the seasoning. Keep warm.
 
Crystal serves this soup in oregano bread cups. Any plain or flavored bread loaf may be substituted, but this soup is also delicious simply served in shallow soup bowls. If you are using the bread bowls:
 
1. Preheat the oven to 200°F.
 
2. Cut off the top of each bread loaf. With a large spoon, remove the soft inner part of the bread.
 
3. Place the loaves on a baking pan and warm in the oven for about 5 minutes. Remove the warm bread loaves from the oven and pour the hot soup into the bread cups.
 
4. Garnish with the rosemary sprigs and serve.
Oceania's French onion soup from Jacques
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4. French Onion Soup
Served at: Jacques on Oceania Marina and Oceania Riviera

Jacques Pépin himself designed the recipes for this bistro on Oceania Cruises' two newest ships, and it's filled with French comfort food dishes from his childhood. One of the best: a gorgeous French onion soup, capped with melted Gruyère cheese. The secret to the complex flavors is that, unlike most recipes, it includes both red and white wines. 
 
Ingredients
  • 7 cups beef stock
  • 3 tbsp unsalted butter 
  • 9 cups thinly sliced onion (3 lbs)
  • 3 thyme sprigs
  • 2 marjoram sprigs
  • 12 to 16 slices baguette, each 1/4 inch thick
  • Extra virgin olive oil
  • 1/3 cup dry white wine such as Chardonnay
  • 1/3 cup dry red wine such as Merlot
  • 3 tbsp brandy
  • 3 1/2 cups chicken stock
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • About 2 cups shredded Gruyère or Emmentaler cheese
 
Directions
1. Pour the beef stock into a large saucepan and bring to a gentle boil over medium-high heat. Adjust the heat as needed to maintain a gentle boil and cook until the stock is reduced to 3 1/2 cups, 25 to 30 minutes. Set aside. 
 
2. In a stockpot or soup pot, melt the butter over medium heat. Add the onion and garlic and cook, stirring often, until the onion is translucent and a light golden brown, 15 to 20 minutes. Reduce the heat to medium-low and cook until the onion is a rich brown, lowering the heat as necessary to prevent scorching, 45 minutes to 1 hour.
 
3. Meanwhile, place the thyme and marjoram sprigs on a small piece of cheesecloth and tie into a sachet. Preheat the oven to 350°F. 
 
4. Select 4 flameproof individual serving bowls. Using the bowls to judge how many slices you will need, lay enough baguette slices to cover the openings of all 4 bowls on a sheet pan. Lightly brush the baguette slices on both sides with olive oil. Place in the oven and heat, turning once, until dry, about 5 minutes on each side. Do not allow the bread to color. Set aside. 
 
5. Add the white wine, red wine, and brandy to the browned onion, bring to a simmer over medium-high heat, and simmer, stirring occasionally, until the alcohol evaporates and the onion is glazed, about 5 minutes. Add the sachet, the reduced beef stock, and the chicken stock and bring to a simmer. Keep at a low simmer, uncovered, for 1 hour. Season with salt and pepper.
 
6. Preheat the broiler. Place the serving bowls on a small sheet pan. Ladle the soup into the bowls. Top with bread slices, and then top the bread slices with enough cheese to cover the bread completely and extend to the rims of the bowls, about 1/2 cup for each bowl. Place under the broiler until the cheese is bubbling and toasted.
 
Chef's note: "Don't try to keep the crocks neat and tidy," says Jacques. "You need to drape the grated cheese over the top, so that some of it melts down onto the crock and becomes toasted and crusty. That's the traditional way."
Served at: Jacques on Oceania Marina and Oceania Riviera

Jacques Pépin himself designed the recipes for this bistro on Oceania Cruises' two newest ships, and it's filled with French comfort food dishes from his childhood. One of the best: a gorgeous French onion soup, capped with melted Gruyère cheese. The secret to the complex flavors is that, unlike most recipes, it includes both red and white wines. 
 
Ingredients
  • 7 cups beef stock
  • 3 tbsp unsalted butter 
  • 9 cups thinly sliced onion (3 lbs)
  • 3 thyme sprigs
  • 2 marjoram sprigs
  • 12 to 16 slices baguette, each 1/4 inch thick
  • Extra virgin olive oil
  • 1/3 cup dry white wine such as Chardonnay
  • 1/3 cup dry red wine such as Merlot
  • 3 tbsp brandy
  • 3 1/2 cups chicken stock
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • About 2 cups shredded Gruyère or Emmentaler cheese
 
Directions
1. Pour the beef stock into a large saucepan and bring to a gentle boil over medium-high heat. Adjust the heat as needed to maintain a gentle boil and cook until the stock is reduced to 3 1/2 cups, 25 to 30 minutes. Set aside. 
 
2. In a stockpot or soup pot, melt the butter over medium heat. Add the onion and garlic and cook, stirring often, until the onion is translucent and a light golden brown, 15 to 20 minutes. Reduce the heat to medium-low and cook until the onion is a rich brown, lowering the heat as necessary to prevent scorching, 45 minutes to 1 hour.
 
3. Meanwhile, place the thyme and marjoram sprigs on a small piece of cheesecloth and tie into a sachet. Preheat the oven to 350°F. 
 
4. Select 4 flameproof individual serving bowls. Using the bowls to judge how many slices you will need, lay enough baguette slices to cover the openings of all 4 bowls on a sheet pan. Lightly brush the baguette slices on both sides with olive oil. Place in the oven and heat, turning once, until dry, about 5 minutes on each side. Do not allow the bread to color. Set aside. 
 
5. Add the white wine, red wine, and brandy to the browned onion, bring to a simmer over medium-high heat, and simmer, stirring occasionally, until the alcohol evaporates and the onion is glazed, about 5 minutes. Add the sachet, the reduced beef stock, and the chicken stock and bring to a simmer. Keep at a low simmer, uncovered, for 1 hour. Season with salt and pepper.
 
6. Preheat the broiler. Place the serving bowls on a small sheet pan. Ladle the soup into the bowls. Top with bread slices, and then top the bread slices with enough cheese to cover the bread completely and extend to the rims of the bowls, about 1/2 cup for each bowl. Place under the broiler until the cheese is bubbling and toasted.
 
Chef's note: "Don't try to keep the crocks neat and tidy," says Jacques. "You need to drape the grated cheese over the top, so that some of it melts down onto the crock and becomes toasted and crusty. That's the traditional way."
Scones on Cunard
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5. Fruit Scones
Served at: Queen's Room on Cunard Line
 
No line does afternoon tea better than British Cunard Line, and these scones are part of what makes the experience. Filled with golden raisins — known in the U.K. as sultanas — they're served with raspberry jam and clotted cream for a decadent afternoon treat. 
 
Ingredients
  • 8 oz self-rising flour
  • Pinch of salt
  • 2 oz butter
  • 1 oz sultanas (golden raisins)
  • 1 oz superfine sugar
  • 5 fl oz milk

Directions
1. Heat the oven to 425°F. Lightly grease a baking sheet.

2. Mix together the flour and salt and rub in the butter.

3. Stir in the sultanas, sugar, and then the milk to get a soft dough; rest in the fridge for 1 hour.

4. Turn on to a floured work surface and knead very lightly. Pat out to a round 3/4 inch thick. Use a 2-inch cutter to stamp out rounds and place on a baking sheet. Lightly knead together the rest of the dough and stamp out more scones to use it all up.

5. Brush the tops of the scones with a little milk. Bake for 12-15 minutes until well risen and golden.

6. Cool on a wire rack and serve with butter, good jam, and maybe some clotted cream.
Served at: Queen's Room on Cunard Line
 
No line does afternoon tea better than British Cunard Line, and these scones are part of what makes the experience. Filled with golden raisins — known in the U.K. as sultanas — they're served with raspberry jam and clotted cream for a decadent afternoon treat. 
 
Ingredients
  • 8 oz self-rising flour
  • Pinch of salt
  • 2 oz butter
  • 1 oz sultanas (golden raisins)
  • 1 oz superfine sugar
  • 5 fl oz milk

Directions
1. Heat the oven to 425°F. Lightly grease a baking sheet.

2. Mix together the flour and salt and rub in the butter.

3. Stir in the sultanas, sugar, and then the milk to get a soft dough; rest in the fridge for 1 hour.

4. Turn on to a floured work surface and knead very lightly. Pat out to a round 3/4 inch thick. Use a 2-inch cutter to stamp out rounds and place on a baking sheet. Lightly knead together the rest of the dough and stamp out more scones to use it all up.

5. Brush the tops of the scones with a little milk. Bake for 12-15 minutes until well risen and golden.

6. Cool on a wire rack and serve with butter, good jam, and maybe some clotted cream.
Canelé
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6. Chocolate Cannelé
Served at: Cooking demonstrations on River Royale
 
Uniworld offers a cooking demo of these ancient desserts in the lounge on cruises that visit Bordeaux. The famously eggy desserts caramelize on the outside for a complex flavor that's sweet and rich. 
 
Ingredients
  • 2 cups milk
  • 1 vanilla pod
  • 5 tbsp butter
  • 1/2 cup chocolate couverture
  • 1 cup icing sugar
  • 3/4 cup flour
  • 1 tbsp cocoa powder
  • 2 whole eggs
  • 2 egg yolks
  • 4 tsp rum negrita
 
Directions
1. Boil together the milk, vanilla, and butter. Pour the liquid over the chocolate, whisking to obtain an emulsion, and set aside.
 
2. Sift together the sugar, flour, and cocoa powder. Add the mix to the eggs.
 
3. Add the chocolate mix and mix with a mixer. Finally, add the rum.
 
4. Fill in the cannelé molds and bake at 375° F for 35 to 40 minutes.
Served at: Cooking demonstrations on River Royale
 
Uniworld offers a cooking demo of these ancient desserts in the lounge on cruises that visit Bordeaux. The famously eggy desserts caramelize on the outside for a complex flavor that's sweet and rich. 
 
Ingredients
  • 2 cups milk
  • 1 vanilla pod
  • 5 tbsp butter
  • 1/2 cup chocolate couverture
  • 1 cup icing sugar
  • 3/4 cup flour
  • 1 tbsp cocoa powder
  • 2 whole eggs
  • 2 egg yolks
  • 4 tsp rum negrita
 
Directions
1. Boil together the milk, vanilla, and butter. Pour the liquid over the chocolate, whisking to obtain an emulsion, and set aside.
 
2. Sift together the sugar, flour, and cocoa powder. Add the mix to the eggs.
 
3. Add the chocolate mix and mix with a mixer. Finally, add the rum.
 
4. Fill in the cannelé molds and bake at 375° F for 35 to 40 minutes.
Roast chicken
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7. Roast Chicken

Served at: The Grill on Seabourn Quest and Seabourn Encore

It never seems like a smart decision to order the chicken in a steakhouse, but this may just be the one exception. Thomas Keller is known for his extraordinary roast chicken, which is served in some of his restaurants and featured in his cookbooks. It's an incredibly simple recipe, but the presentation — displayed table side on a silver tray surrounded by roasted vegetables, before being sliced off the bone for you — is memorable. 

Ingredients

  • One 2- to 3-pound farm-raised chicken
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 tsp minced thyme (optional)
  • Unsalted butter
  • Dijon mustard

Directions
1. Preheat the oven to 450°F. Rinse the chicken, then dry it very well with paper towels, inside and out. The less it steams, the drier the heat, the better.

2. Salt and pepper the cavity, then truss the bird. Trussing is not difficult, and if you roast chicken often, it's a good technique to feel comfortable with. When you truss a bird, the wings and legs stay close to the body; the ends of the drumsticks cover the top of the breast and keep it from drying out. Trussing helps the chicken to cook evenly, and it also makes for a more beautiful roasted bird.

3. Now, salt the chicken — I like to rain the salt over the bird so that it has a nice uniform coating that will result in a crisp, salty, flavorful skin (about 1 tablespoon). When it's cooked, you should still be able to make out the salt baked onto the crisp skin. Season to taste with pepper.

4. Place the chicken in a sauté pan or roasting pan and, when the oven is up to temperature, put the chicken in the oven. I leave it alone — I don't baste it, I don't add butter; you can if you wish, but I feel this creates steam, which I don't want. Roast it until it's done, 50 to 60 minutes. Remove it from the oven and add the thyme, if using, to the pan. Baste the chicken with the juices and thyme and let it rest for 15 minutes on a cutting board.

5. Remove the twine. Separate the middle wing joint and eat that immediately. Remove the legs and thighs. I like to take off the backbone and eat one of the oysters, the two succulent morsels of meat embedded here, and give the other to the person I'm cooking with. But I take the chicken butt for myself. I could never understand why my brothers always fought over that triangular tip — until one day I got the crispy, juicy fat myself. These are the cook's rewards. Cut the breast down the middle and serve it on the bone, with one wing joint still attached to each. The preparation is not meant to be super elegant. Slather the meat with fresh butter. Serve with mustard on the side and, if you wish, a simple green salad. You'll start using a knife and fork, but finish with your fingers because it's so good.

Served at: The Grill on Seabourn Quest and Seabourn Encore

It never seems like a smart decision to order the chicken in a steakhouse, but this may just be the one exception. Thomas Keller is known for his extraordinary roast chicken, which is served in some of his restaurants and featured in his cookbooks. It's an incredibly simple recipe, but the presentation — displayed table side on a silver tray surrounded by roasted vegetables, before being sliced off the bone for you — is memorable. 

Ingredients

  • One 2- to 3-pound farm-raised chicken
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 tsp minced thyme (optional)
  • Unsalted butter
  • Dijon mustard

Directions
1. Preheat the oven to 450°F. Rinse the chicken, then dry it very well with paper towels, inside and out. The less it steams, the drier the heat, the better.

2. Salt and pepper the cavity, then truss the bird. Trussing is not difficult, and if you roast chicken often, it's a good technique to feel comfortable with. When you truss a bird, the wings and legs stay close to the body; the ends of the drumsticks cover the top of the breast and keep it from drying out. Trussing helps the chicken to cook evenly, and it also makes for a more beautiful roasted bird.

3. Now, salt the chicken — I like to rain the salt over the bird so that it has a nice uniform coating that will result in a crisp, salty, flavorful skin (about 1 tablespoon). When it's cooked, you should still be able to make out the salt baked onto the crisp skin. Season to taste with pepper.

4. Place the chicken in a sauté pan or roasting pan and, when the oven is up to temperature, put the chicken in the oven. I leave it alone — I don't baste it, I don't add butter; you can if you wish, but I feel this creates steam, which I don't want. Roast it until it's done, 50 to 60 minutes. Remove it from the oven and add the thyme, if using, to the pan. Baste the chicken with the juices and thyme and let it rest for 15 minutes on a cutting board.

5. Remove the twine. Separate the middle wing joint and eat that immediately. Remove the legs and thighs. I like to take off the backbone and eat one of the oysters, the two succulent morsels of meat embedded here, and give the other to the person I'm cooking with. But I take the chicken butt for myself. I could never understand why my brothers always fought over that triangular tip — until one day I got the crispy, juicy fat myself. These are the cook's rewards. Cut the breast down the middle and serve it on the bone, with one wing joint still attached to each. The preparation is not meant to be super elegant. Slather the meat with fresh butter. Serve with mustard on the side and, if you wish, a simple green salad. You'll start using a knife and fork, but finish with your fingers because it's so good.

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