The 5 Least-Visited Countries in the World

by Amanda Black and Lauren Dana

The 5 Least-Visited Countries in the World

by Amanda Black and Lauren Dana

Are you dreaming of a one-of-a-kind vacation? You know, one that would have your friends drooling over your fascinating, off-the-beaten-path exploits? We decided to take a page from Robert Frost and go down the road (way) less traveled. Here are five least-visited countries in the world.

Are you dreaming of a one-of-a-kind vacation? You know, one that would have your friends drooling over your fascinating, off-the-beaten-path exploits? We decided to take a page from Robert Frost and go down the road (way) less traveled. Here are five least-visited countries in the world.

5
Niue / MollyBrownNZ/iStock
Marshall Islands
1 of 5
The Marshall Islands

Located in the Pacific between Hawaii and the Phillippines, The Marshall Islands (which only recorded 6,800 visitors in 2018) is comprised of 34 atolls spread out over 70 square miles. The islands are home to over 1,000 different species of fish, making it the perfect spot for divers. One of the most popular diving spots is the sunken Japanese battleship Nagato, which led the attack on Pearl Harbor. Plus, since the isles are actually atolls (ring-shaped islands) you'll never be more than 100 meters from the water. The largest atoll is Majuro, the capital. Here, you'll find several hotels, including the Marshall Islands Resort, along with an array of shopping and dining options. You won't find a lively nightlife scene here, though; people typically come to the islands to relax and soak up the sun. 

Read more: 10 Little-Known Dream Islands
 

Located in the Pacific between Hawaii and the Phillippines, The Marshall Islands (which only recorded 6,800 visitors in 2018) is comprised of 34 atolls spread out over 70 square miles. The islands are home to over 1,000 different species of fish, making it the perfect spot for divers. One of the most popular diving spots is the sunken Japanese battleship Nagato, which led the attack on Pearl Harbor. Plus, since the isles are actually atolls (ring-shaped islands) you'll never be more than 100 meters from the water. The largest atoll is Majuro, the capital. Here, you'll find several hotels, including the Marshall Islands Resort, along with an array of shopping and dining options. You won't find a lively nightlife scene here, though; people typically come to the islands to relax and soak up the sun. 

Kiribati
2 of 5
Kiribati

This island republic in the Pacific is slightly larger than New York City and had just 7,100 visitors in 2018. It offers a wealth of bucket-list-worthy diving, snorkeling, and fishing opportunities. Some of the bloodiest battles in World War II also took place here. Today, you'll still find rusted tanks, shipwrecks, and abandoned gun turrets. Christmas Island, the capital, is home to several hotels. One of the more popular properties, Captain Cook Hotel, occupies an old British military base. While you're here, you may even catch the ghost of Amelia Earhart. Many argue the Phoenix Islands Protected Area (PIPA) is where the famous aviatrix crashed during her now-legendary last flight around the world.

Read more: Add These 8 Travel Memoirs to Your Summer Reading List, ASAP
 

This island republic in the Pacific is slightly larger than New York City and had just 7,100 visitors in 2018. It offers a wealth of bucket-list-worthy diving, snorkeling, and fishing opportunities. Some of the bloodiest battles in World War II also took place here. Today, you'll still find rusted tanks, shipwrecks, and abandoned gun turrets. Christmas Island, the capital, is home to several hotels. One of the more popular properties, Captain Cook Hotel, occupies an old British military base. While you're here, you may even catch the ghost of Amelia Earhart. Many argue the Phoenix Islands Protected Area (PIPA) is where the famous aviatrix crashed during her now-legendary last flight around the world.

Tuvalu
3 of 5
Tuvalu

This tiny country doesn't offer much by way of attractions or nightlife, but, if you are a nature enthusiast (or just someone who loves a beautiful beach) then put Tuvalu on your list. With just 10 square miles, (that's smaller than the campus of Penn State University) Tuvalu is halfway between Australia and Hawaii. If you're looking for a place where you can relax, sit on a pristine beach, and listen to the waves roll in, put this idyllic destination on your bucket list. In 2018, the island reported just 2,700 visitors per year – so you won't have to deal with tourist-packed beaches.  

Read more: The World’s Best Secluded Beaches
 

This tiny country doesn't offer much by way of attractions or nightlife, but, if you are a nature enthusiast (or just someone who loves a beautiful beach) then put Tuvalu on your list. With just 10 square miles, (that's smaller than the campus of Penn State University) Tuvalu is halfway between Australia and Hawaii. If you're looking for a place where you can relax, sit on a pristine beach, and listen to the waves roll in, put this idyllic destination on your bucket list. In 2018, the island reported just 2,700 visitors per year – so you won't have to deal with tourist-packed beaches.  

 

 

Cave in Niue
4 of 5
Niue

This small, rocky island nation is located smack in the middle of the South Pacific. It's surrounded by coral reefs and features sunny, tropical weather. It's best known for its beautiful beaches. Despite the fact that there are high levels of natural radioactivity in the soil, no negative effects have been reported. As of June 2019, Niue reported just 2,799 annual visitors. 

Read more: 12 Ways to Save on a South Pacific Vacation
 

This small, rocky island nation is located smack in the middle of the South Pacific. It's surrounded by coral reefs and features sunny, tropical weather. It's best known for its beautiful beaches. Despite the fact that there are high levels of natural radioactivity in the soil, no negative effects have been reported. As of June 2019, Niue reported just 2,799 annual visitors. 

 Republic of Nauru
5 of 5
Nauru

This island is so small that you can easily run – or walk – around the whole island. (Besides, who doesn't want to say they've run around a country?) While Nauru is trying hard to attract more travelers, there isn't much to do here. There are very few restaurants and bars, and fresh drinking water is especially precious. Nature, however, abounds. With a population of only 19,000 and only 200 visitors per year, the beaches are practically untouched. Coral reefs surround the island and make for great diving. Meanwhile, the center of the island also has an old phosphate mine that visitors can explore. Only one airline flies in and out of Nauru, called Nauru Airlines.

Read more: 4 Totally Unique Scuba Diving Destinations
 

This island is so small that you can easily run – or walk – around the whole island. (Besides, who doesn't want to say they've run around a country?) While Nauru is trying hard to attract more travelers, there isn't much to do here. There are very few restaurants and bars, and fresh drinking water is especially precious. Nature, however, abounds. With a population of only 19,000 and only 200 visitors per year, the beaches are practically untouched. Coral reefs surround the island and make for great diving. Meanwhile, the center of the island also has an old phosphate mine that visitors can explore. Only one airline flies in and out of Nauru, called Nauru Airlines. 

 

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